Notification Schedules and PagerDuty

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

Whenever we’re asked how to make on-call notification schedules for Scout alerts, we recommend PagerDuty. PagerDuty has invested a ton of time in building a dedicated notification scheduling service, and it’s a great complement to Scout.

With our recent release of notification groups, Scout’s integration with PagerDuty got even more powerful:

  • Multiple PagerDuty services: add as many PagerDuty services to Scout as necessary.
  • Trigger-specific escalation policies: assign any PagerDuty escalation policy to any threshold in Scout. If you need to create multiple thresholds on a given metric with different escalation policies, it’s simple to do – just add another trigger.
  • Automatic incident resolution from Scout: since all integrations are routed through PagerDuty’s API, Scout now auto-resolves any PagerDuty incidents when Scout’s trigger stops firing.

Multiple services in PagerDuty:


... and those same services integrated into Scout:

Adding PagerDuty services within Scout

You need to start in Scout to create a PagerDuty integration:

  1. Click on Notifications (in the top navigation bar),
  2. Click on “Add PagerDuty Integration.”
  3. You’ll be given the option to create a new PagerDuty service, or connect to an existing service within your account.

To assign a PagerDuty service to a trigger, ensure the PagerDuty integration is part of a notification group (the notification group can contain other items too, if needed), then assign that notification group to a trigger.

Related posts

 

Sidekiq and Puppet Monitoring Plugins = 70+ plugins strong!

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

With the Sidekiq Monitor Plugin (by Scott Klein of StatusPage.io) and the Puppet Last Run Plugin (by Didip Kerabat of Kongregrate) Scout’s plugin directory count has now passed 70 plugins!

The Sidekiq Monitor Plugin monitors key metrics for Sidekiq, a Ruby message processing library. Didip’s Puppet Last Run Plugin tracks key metrics for the most recent Puppet run on a monitored server.

Have a useful plugin sitting around? Share it! Send a pull request to our scout-plugins repository on Github.

 

The reward of redundancy: time

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Business Bullet_white Comments Comments

It’s been a month since I started attaching torture devices disguised as boots to my feet, long wooden sticks to each torture device, and tumbling down mountains. Skiing has changed my outlook on winter. It’s a season to enjoy, not a time where I gaze wistfully out the window, hoping the short, cold days pass by as quickly as possible.

However, there’s a problem when skiing becomes a favorite hobby: not everyday is a great day on the mountain. If it hasn’t snowed in a while, the surface is hard. The temperature might be in the single digits and the wind may be gusting 50 MPH+. It might dump snow in the backcountry, but the avalanche conditions may make it unsafe.

There’s something special about being able to sneak away when the conditions are the best, even if it’s during the work week. It feels a bit like being a kid again (correction: a kid with a receding hairline). It’s a fun reminder that it’s not always bad to feel redundant.

 

Our DIY Homepage Process

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Development Bullet_white Comments Comments

We recently decided it was time for a major update to the public side of Scout. We’d start with a more polished homepage. Since we’re both developers, the obvious next step seemed like hiring a designer. However, working with an outside designer isn’t a hire-and-forget experience:

  • Good designers are difficult to find. Design doesn’t scale like a product business.
  • Good designers are busy. It could take 30-60 days to start work, then another 30 days for it to come together. This means we could be looking at a 90 day timeline. We wanted to launch it faster.

Instead of starting work with a designer on a blank slate, we decided to start firming up what we wanted the homepage to look like. We’d end up with one of the following outcomes:

  • We’re terrible at design, but we’ve at least thought it through. Hire a designer.
  • We can get 80% of the way there, but we’ll need a designer for touchups.
  • If we iterate enough, we can launch something we’ll be happy with.

Read More →

 

Team BFF

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Development Bullet_white Comments Comments

Startup Lessions from CCP - EVE Online Style:

Another great example was the formation of “Team Best Friends Forever” (“BFF” is an inside EVE joke). This team is a group of CCP developers whose sole mission is not to work on major features and improvements, but rather to fix all those annoying “little things” that bother their customers. Too many times, product managers and development teams are focused on the big-ticket items – and that’s fine, but TBFF is a great approach that again proves that CCP listens to their customers.
 

Notifcation groups coming Jan 15th

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

On Jan 15th, all Scout accounts will be switched over to notification groups. Notification groups are designed to make notifiation management easier and more flexible:

  • instead of managing notifications per-plugin/per-user, you will assign users to notification groups, and apply notification groups to triggers.
  • you can have multiple PagerDuty integrations and webhook endpoints and assign those to notification groups as well. PagerDuty and webhooks are now first-class notification channels; they are no longer all-or-nothing settings.
  • you get much finer control over threshold-to-notification channel mappings. You can configure (for example) three triggers on one metric, with the lowest trigger sending you email, the middle trigger sending you SMS, and the high trigger alerting PagerDuty.

Read More →

 

Older posts: 1 ... 25 26 27 28 29 ... 68