The nuts and bolts of our Ruby-based realtime charts solution

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Development, HowTo Bullet_white Comments Comments

Scout’s realtime charts have been a big hit. Once you start using them for major deploys or performance incidents, going back to ten terminal windows running “top” feels like the dark ages.

Realtime was a lot of fun to implement and it’s been rock-solid so far. A big reason it was so much fun? We were able to implement all of it in Ruby (outside the Javascript used to handle websockets in the browser) and didn’t need to deploy any infrastructure .

So, how did we go about it?

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Easily compare the same metric across servers (the context menu)

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

When you’re building a chart in Scout, you select metrics from a tree. It branches like this: group => server => plugin => metrics.

This makes it easy to drill-down to a given metric on a specific server. However, it’s very common to compare the same metric across servers. For example: how does our memory usage compare across all of our app servers? Say hello to the new metric context menu:

He’s a useful little guy. After selecting a metric in the chart tree, just click on the icon and select the instances you’d like to see on the chart.

 

Plateau triggers and Low Values

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

Since we added low value support for peak triggers a few months ago, similar support for plateau triggers has been a common request.

We heard you: plateau triggers now also support low values. You can, for example, be alerted when when Apache requests drop below a certain threshold for 30 minutes or more.

 

Why doesn't anyone want to build companies anymore?

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Business Bullet_white Comments Comments

It seems that today, the light at the end of the startup tunnel is either (1) being acquired or (2) a billion-dollar IPO. Let’s just throw out the IPO - it’s incredibly rare.

This means that many startups are created with an explicit goal to not exist in five-or-so years. Does anyone see something wrong with this?

No one talks about starting a company that becomes an extension of yourself. Warren Buffet and Berkshire Hathaway. Apple and Steve Jobs. Starbucks and Howard Schultz. Amazon and Jeff Bezos.

Why?

 

Hello Fort Collins!

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Updates Bullet_white Comments Comments

A month ago my family and I moved from one special city to another: San Francisco to Fort Collins, Colorado. While we’ve only lived here a short time, we couldn’t be happier. You probably know many of the one-of-kind-things about San Francisco. Here’s some of the things that make “The Fort” special:

  • Bikes – Whether you’re cruising around or hammering, Ft. Collins is an amazing experience on two wheels. Almost every street has a bike lane, and for those that don’t, there’s usually a nearby dedicated trail. The city itself is flat – which is perfect for going to the office – but immediately to the west, the foothills of the Rockies beckon with all the scenic road and mountain biking you could ask for.
  • Beer – With 11 breweries, Ft. Collins is the second largest producer of beer in the top-ranked beer producing state (and yes, you can pretty much bike to all of them).
  • Tech – There’s a small (by SF standards) but super-friendly tech community in Ft. Collins. I’m working out of Cohere, an awesome coworking space in the middle of Ft. Collins. Conveniently, the monthly Ruby Meetup meets here. Boulder, home to many startups, is an hour south.
  • Climate – Winter happens here (it’s mild), but summer does too!

When you combine the above bullets, it’s no wonder Ft. Collins consistently ranks among the best places to live in America. If you’re in the area, don’t hesitate to ping me for a visit!

 

On writing

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Development Bullet_white Comments Comments

Ernest Hemingway via Letters of Note

I write one page of masterpiece to ninety one pages of shit. I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.

Sounds a lot like writing code too, huh?

 

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