"Plugins" Posts


Memcached Monitoring

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

Jesse Newland of Rails Machine has created a Memcached monitor plugin to track all the key stats from your Memcached instance, including gets/ sets/ hits/ misses/ evictions/ per second, uptime, memory used, KB read per second, KB written per second, and more.

Install the Memcached plugin from our directory, and enjoy! Let us know if you have any feedback.

 

MongoDB Slow Queries Monitoring

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

Thanks to Jacob Harris, we have a MongoDB Slow Queries plugin for Scout.

The MongoDB plugin captures the number of slow queries per minute according to the threshold you specify. It also reports details of any slow queries that take place.

Of course, like any other Scout plugin, you can set trend triggers, graph results, etc.

Please install from our directory, kick the tires, and let us know if you have any feedback!

Also, for general MongoDB Monitoring, checkout the MongoDB Monitoring Plugin.

 

In-depth Rails Monitoring using only a production log file

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Plugins, Features Bullet_white Comments Comments  Bullet_white no trackbacks

No Rails plugins to install. No performance hit during the request cycle. Nothing to break your application code. Nothing to restart. With just the path to your production Rails log file, Scout’s new Rails monitoring plugin alerts you when your Ruby on Rails application is slowing down and provides detailed daily performance reports.

First, an open-source shoutout: thanks to Willem van Bergen and Bart ten Brinke (the Rails Doctors) for their Request Log Analyzer gem, which we built upon for this functionality.

Rails analysis made easy

  1. Easy setup. All we need is a path to the log file of your production Rails application. That’s it. There’s nothing to configure in your Rails application. Unlike our previous Rails analyzer, you don’t have to install a Rails plugin or even redeploy your Rails application. There are zero changes to your Rails code base.
  1. In-depth analysis. Get rendering time and database time on a per-action basis. Know your error code rates, HTTP request types, cache hit ratios, and more.
  1. No performance impact. Since the analysis happens out the request-response cycle, there is no performance impact on your running Rails app.
  2. Alerts. Like all Scout plugins, you can get alerts based on the flat data the plugin produces. Get alerts on requests/minute, number of slow requests, and average request length.

How it works

The plugin performs a combination of incremental and batch processing on your application’s logfile. Every time the Scout agent runs (3min-30min, depending on your Scout plan, it parses new entries in your log file since the last time it ran. This provides key metrics for near-realtime graphs and alerts.

Once a day, the Analyzer runs to crunch the numbers for more in-depth metrics. This is what provides the breakdowns among all your actions, analysis of most popular actions, most expensive actions, etc.

Try it out!

Install the Rails Analysis plugin. If you don’t already have a Scout account, all of our accounts have a 30 day free trial.

 

EC2 CloudWatch graphs, trends, and alerts

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Updates, Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

If you're using Amazon EC2, you may be familiar with CloudWatch, Amazon's analytic system that provides metrics on CPU usage, Network I/O, and Disk I/O of your instances. While CloudWatch collects metrics, it doesn't provide a web interface for viewing the metrics, graphs, trending, or alerting.

Enter our Scout EC2 Cloudwatch plugin. Like any other Scout plugin, you can graph the resulting metrics, set triggers, track trends, and get email alerts when the numbers go out of bounds.


What does it monitor?

The CloudWatch plugin captures the following ("measures", as EC2 calls them): NetworkIn, NetworkOut, DiskReadOps, DiskWriteOps DiskReadBytes, DiskWriteBytes, CPUUtilization.

Note, this plugin does not fetch EC2 Load Balancer Metrics, only EC2 instance metrics.


Single Instance, Autoscaling Group, etc.

The EC2 CloudWatch plugin can capture metrics from a single EC2 instance, or it can aggregate metrics across a couple of dimensions. It can aggregate metrics across a given instance type, across all instances launched from a specific image (AMI), or by a specified autoscaling group. That means you can, for example, graph the performance of your application server autoscaling group as a whole, or graph just your memcached instance.

Enabling Cloudwatch

To use this plugin, you have to enable CloudWatch for the instance(s) you want to collect metrics from. See Amazon's CloudWatch docs for details. Basically, it's just ec2-monitor-instances ##### from the command line, or passing a monitoring parameter to the ec2-run-instances. It's covered nicely in Amazon's docs.

New to Scout?

If you're learning about Scout through this plugin, sign up for a trial Scout account to give this plugin a try. You can graph all kinds of metrics and measurements from all your servers. It works with cloud instances, VPS's, and dedicated hardware.

 

Scout Checks in on Passenger

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Updates, Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

The number one requested plugin for Scout has been a Phusion Passenger monitor. I’m happy to report that is now available.

Scout ~ Advance Marketing Engine

Using the new Passenger Monitor plugin, Scout can keep track of Passenger’s VM size, process count, and the amount of private memory it has squirreled away. Aside from just tracking these numbers for graphs, you can also elect to be emailed if any of these statistics crosses a line you indicate. As an added bonus, this plugin also tracks the same statistics for the Apache instance managing Passenger.

Passenger has quickly become a great new way to deploy Rails applications and we want to make sure Scout is keeping up with the curve.

 

Track Active Logins & more

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Plugins Bullet_white Comments Comments

Ever wanted to track how many people are logged into your server? Mark Hasse built an Active Logins plugin that does just that, returning the total number of people logged in via console, ssh, telnet, etc.

Mark has built several other plugins as well:

It’s easy to create a Scout a plugin and we’re here to help. Some useful plugin resources:
 

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