"Features" Posts


Don't want your server named after hostname?

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

If you’re using Scout’s cloud server functionality, you know that new server instances in Scout are named after the machine’s hostname.

In some cases, the hostname isn’t that useful (especially if your servers are on EC2). Now, you can specify a name for the server from the Scout command:

scout --name="Memcached server" KEY ...

... for example, would name the new instance ”Memcached server”. Documentation on naming your server from the scout command is here.

As always, drop us an email if you have any questions!

 

A redesigned dashboard & server groups

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

Answering “how is my cluster performing?” just got a lot easier. We’ve rolled out a redesigned account dashboard that makes filtering the noise in your server cluster a lot more efficient.

The dashboard

The updated account homepage lists each server and 3 key metrics:

  • Server load over the last minute
  • Memory usage
  • Disk usage

The sidebar shows any active alerts.

Server Groups

Create groups (ex: web servers) and place servers in those groups. These grouped servers are shown together on the account dashboard.

Timeframe selection

By default, the dashboard shows the most recent data across servers. You can also choose to display aggregated metrics across a longer period (up to the previous 7 days). We’ve worked hard to make toggling between different timeframes speedy so comparing data should be painless.

Background

Our previous dashboard had too much noise. It was difficult to tell where the emergencies were. We’ve found this update makes checking the status of our own cluster at Scout far more efficient.

Past Feature Updates

 

Scout for the iPhone: BirdDog

By Derek Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

Shawn Veader of V8 Logic has released BirdDog, an iPhone application for Scout. The app is on sale for $1.99 through Thursday.

With BirdDog, you can track the health of servers you are monitoring with Scout. BirdDog provides an alert history for each server, highlighting any active alerts. It’s a simple way to stay on top of your server infrastructure for the price of a cup coffee.

You can download the application from the iTunes App Store.

I pestered Shawn a bit about BirdDog and iPhone development below.

Read More →

 

First Impressions Count

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Features Bullet_white Comments Comments

Scout is making a better first impression than ever starting today. When you start monitoring a new server, you'll immediately get a high-level summary of the vital stats:

Scout reports this for you automatically. From there, you choose the deeper metrics you need, like Ruby on Rails monitoring, MySQL Slow Queries, Process memory usage, etc.

 

In-depth Rails Monitoring using only a production log file

By Andre Bullet_white Posted in Plugins, Features Bullet_white Comments Comments  Bullet_white no trackbacks

No Rails plugins to install. No performance hit during the request cycle. Nothing to break your application code. Nothing to restart. With just the path to your production Rails log file, Scout’s new Rails monitoring plugin alerts you when your Ruby on Rails application is slowing down and provides detailed daily performance reports.

First, an open-source shoutout: thanks to Willem van Bergen and Bart ten Brinke (the Rails Doctors) for their Request Log Analyzer gem, which we built upon for this functionality.

Rails analysis made easy

  1. Easy setup. All we need is a path to the log file of your production Rails application. That’s it. There’s nothing to configure in your Rails application. Unlike our previous Rails analyzer, you don’t have to install a Rails plugin or even redeploy your Rails application. There are zero changes to your Rails code base.
  1. In-depth analysis. Get rendering time and database time on a per-action basis. Know your error code rates, HTTP request types, cache hit ratios, and more.
  1. No performance impact. Since the analysis happens out the request-response cycle, there is no performance impact on your running Rails app.
  2. Alerts. Like all Scout plugins, you can get alerts based on the flat data the plugin produces. Get alerts on requests/minute, number of slow requests, and average request length.

How it works

The plugin performs a combination of incremental and batch processing on your application’s logfile. Every time the Scout agent runs (3min-30min, depending on your Scout plan, it parses new entries in your log file since the last time it ran. This provides key metrics for near-realtime graphs and alerts.

Once a day, the Analyzer runs to crunch the numbers for more in-depth metrics. This is what provides the breakdowns among all your actions, analysis of most popular actions, most expensive actions, etc.

Try it out!

Install the Rails Analysis plugin. If you don’t already have a Scout account, all of our accounts have a 30 day free trial.

 

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